Jun 27 2014

Transformation Through Forgiveness

Published by at 10:24 pm under Minister's Musings

“Transformation Through Forgiveness”:

A Photo Essay

by Rev. Nancy Palmer Jones

On the first evening of the writers’ retreat that I attend in mid June, I walk to the back of La Casa de Maria’s property. For the next three days, eighteen women and I will explore the “underworld” in our writing, seeking sources of depth and value in our own woundedness. It will be a journey of transformation. But on that first night, I find myself in a small parking lot behind the room where we will write and write and write. There stands a glorious statue of a Native American, its shape changing subtly in the fading light. On the plaque at its base, sculptor Francis Jansen (www.graceinstone.com) writes: “Transformation Through Forgiveness” A National Monument for All Peoples This is a tribute to the Native American peoples and stands symbolically for the healing of all wounds, be they physical, emotional, mental, spiritual, or environmental. “Transformation Through Forgiveness” is a call to all humankind for the reconciliation of “man’s inhumanity to man” and represents the acknowledgment in celebration of … “one whole nation, one whole world.” May the eagle soar to eternal heights and envelop humankind into the profoundness of our greater evolution. Here are the pictures I took of that statue, trying to capture its grace, sorrow, beauty, and hope. The last picture—a “tattoo” of leaves shadowed on the warrior’s back—holds for me the essence of our relationship to this Earth, of which we are an inextricable part. This summer, may you feel yourselves transforming into something even deeper and more whole than you already are. May we too be “transformed through forgiveness.” With great love, Rev. Nancy

Summer 2014 Engaging the Feminine Heroic warrior 2Summer 2014 Engaging the Feminine Heroic warrior 3Summer 2014 Engaging Feminine Heroic warrior 1Summer 2014 Engaging the Feminine Heroic warrior tattoo of leaves

P.S. Because the writers’ retreat was called “Engaging the Feminine Heroic”—using the myths of Demeter and Persephone, Inanna and Ereshkigal, to prompt a journey beyond gender into archetypal territory—I offer this second set of images. In another statue by Francis Jansen, “The Gathering,” we discover a mother figure whose face speaks volumes about Love itself.

Summer 2014 Engaging the Feminine Heroic mother and childrenSummer 2014 Engaging the Feminine Heroic 1

 

Comments Off on Transformation Through Forgiveness

Comments are closed at this time.