Mar 24 2017

In Our Own Voices: The Boundaries That Heal and That Harm Us

Published by at 7:54 pm under Minister's Musings

“In Our Own Voices” shares congregants’ free-flowing responses to the theme of the month. We draw these responses from on-line surveys and other meetings. We use them in creating worship, small-group ministry content, and other opportunities for spiritual growth.
Congregants’ responses to this month’s theme, “The Boundaries That Heal and That Harm Us,” speak to our community’s commitment to undoing the boundaries of systemic oppression. They also wrestle with the need for personal boundaries and with how to set limits or say “no” when such responses are the healthy ones.
As we learn how to Make Love Visible in all we do and say, we need to look at boundaries from “both sides.” May these responses stir your own thoughts and actions.
With gratitude for how we grow together,
Rev. Nancy

• We need some boundaries, and we need to remove some others!
• This theme relates to March’s theme of Empathy. How do we understand and feel with another’s experience of the boundaries and borders that separate us? Empathy is a boundary crosser …
• Congregants’ experiences in the Beloved Community Movement, where we sit down and talk with community members, law enforcement, and elected officials, and then work for policy changes—that’s undoing boundaries that harm us.
• At FUCSJ we have been learning how to have Beloved Conversations around race, ethnicity, and class. Now, if we could get more people involved …
• I think of the movement called Black Lives of UU, calling us to live up to our faith’s commitment to undoing racism … in our own house! http://www.blacklivesuu.com/
• Bisexuality: its marginalization (not being seen or named) and the intense effects of that marginalization (including statistics about bi people)
• This is about having a sense of self-worth and integrity.
• How do I set boundaries with difficult people?
• How can I learn how to say “No”?
• Why is it so hard sometimes to set limits with others?
• How do I maintain a boundary for my own self and recognize the overlap of yours?
• Who are you and why are you? Might my perceptions of you be influenced by who am I?
• How do I understand when a boundary has been crossed?

• Bishop Yvette Flunder’s book, Where the Edge Gathers: Building a Community of Radical Inclusion
• A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness—a great HBO documentary from 2015
• “Draw the Circle Wide”—a favorite hymn!

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