Apr 01 2015

April Theme: Transformation and Rebirth

Published by at 4:46 pm under Minister's Musings

“Say, Rev. Nancy, How’s That Book Coming Along?”

A Story of Transformation in Progress

by Rev. Nancy Palmer Jones

 In September, I announced to you—with joy and a tremor of terror—that my co-author Karin Lin and I had signed a two-year contract with Skinner House Books (one of Unitarian Universalism’s presses). After months spent drafting our proposal, we had a few moments to savor those signatures and celebrate our official go-ahead. Then we gulped and plunged into the actual work of researching, writing, and producing the book.

The Joy of the Journey: Unitarian Universalist Congregations on the Road to Multiculturalism is the working title that will surely change. Here at First Unitarian we know that the journey to living out our faith in multicultural, antiracist, antioppressive ways is joyful at times and also difficult, frustrating, and long. Yet even with the stumbles and detours, the confusion and discouragement, progress on this path is necessary, rewarding, and profoundly spiritual. It is truly a “journey toward wholeness” in body, mind, heart, and spirit for individuals and community alike.

As Karin and I build our own multicultural relationship and connect with other Unitarian Universalists on the journey, we find ourselves in the midst of many “transformations and rebirths.” I long to share more of our discoveries with you.

 Progress on the Book

Through the last six months, Karin and I have talked weekly (she lives in Cambridge, Mass.), reviewed the current literature on our topic, interviewed teams from congregations we will feature in the book, refined our vision, revised our table of contents, drafted many paragraphs, designed a requested pamphlet that congregations can put in their entryways, and planned our first site visits to the Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis (UUCA) and to the Leading Edge Conference in New York City later in April. We have heard powerful personal testimonies and gathered a list of core principles. Here’s just a sample:

Testimonies

  • Karin Lin, lay leader at First Parish, Cambridge: “What would I have wanted to know when I first began this work of building multicultural Unitarian Universalist community? That the journey is going to be 10,000 times longer than I thought it would be. And the resistance is going to be hurtful and heartbreaking, but it’s also going to change me more than anything else in my life.”
  • Fred Muir, senior minister at UUCA: “I really do think that our congregations becoming multicultural is an issue of whether Unitarian Universalism will make it into the next century, or even complete this century. It’s a faith I love, [and it] has to begin to change and evolve as the country is evolving.” He reminds us that it took about 300 years to get our congregations to be the way they are now, so he urges us to stick with it for the long haul. “It will take more than a three- to five-year strategic plan to redirect us,” Fred says.
  • John Crestwell, associate minister at UUCA: Ministers must have a fierce commitment to this work, John advises. After all, “it’s my responsibility to take people to task when they are not living up to Unitarian Universalist values,” he says. He finds hope in the diversity of the ministry team leading UUCA now: an older white minister (Fred), an African-American man (John), and a young-adult white woman (Christina Leone Tracy). “Hope is in who is on the chancel leading worship—that’s progress, that’s hope.”

John’s words echo one of the core principles we are discovering. Fred’s words do, too: “Keep your eyes on the prize knowing that there will be detours, stops and starts, frustrations, and disappointments, as well as times of joy and celebrating. It helps to meditate, pray, sing, and look onward to the next milestone.”

As I work on this book, I feel ever closer to you, Beloved Community, and ever more committed to the long and winding road toward multicultural community that you launched at First Unitarian decades ago and along which we continue to move. Please join us on this journey of “transformation and rebirth,” as we sing and meditate and celebrate our way forward this month!

With fierce commitment and abiding love,

Rev. Nancy

Core Principles for Multicultural Congregations

Although there is no single roadmap for navigating this journey, there are certain core principles confirmed by the current literature on multicultural congregations and by the experiences of our Unitarian Universalist conversation partners. These include:

  1. Theological Vision: A powerful commitment to an overarching goal—something higher even than multiculturalism itself. A commitment to living our faith with integrity, which in turn calls us to a life of radical inclusivity.
  2. Clear Mission Statement: A congregational mission that states this commitment clearly.
  3. Equitable, Accountable Governance: Ensuring access and accountability for all and institutionalizing growing our self-awareness around systems of power and privilege. Opportunities for multiculturalism and antiracism trainings are ongoing, with everyone encouraged to participate.
  4. Inclusive Worship in Style and Message: People from nondominant cultures need to be able to see and hear themselves reflected in words, music, leadership, and sacred space.
  5. Diverse Leadership: Having multicultural teams lead worship, serve as ministers, and participate in governance communicates that the congregation values everyone and recognizes their gifts.
  6. Commitment to Working for Justice in the Community: A way of living our faith out loud and of letting the community know that all are welcomed and valued here.
  7. Relationships Are Central: Like all spiritually infused justice work, relationships form the beginning, middle, and end of this work. These relationships meet people “where they are,” while encouraging everyone to grow, stretch, and be open to change.
  8. Patience, Perseverance, Adaptability, a Willingness to Try and to Try Again: A sense of humor and a grounding in Love are crucial, too!

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