Aug 29 2014

September: Oneness/The Unity in Unitarian

Published by at 9:12 pm under Minister's Musings

“We ALL Belong!”
by Rev. Nancy Palmer Jones
The Press Conference
On a sunny day in late August, a diverse group of clergy and congregational leaders gathers in front of Most Holy Trinity Church in east San José. We stand in solidarity with the people of Ferguson, Missouri, after the killing of an unarmed teenager, Michael Brown, by a police officer the week before.
All the Bay Area’s major news outlets are there. The podium bristles with microphones like a porcupine. There is no place to put a script, so we faith leaders speak from the heart.
            “We cannot and must not pretend that we are not all connected to and impacted by the lingering legacy of racism and white supremacy,” Rev. Michael-Ray Mathews offers. “Our communities, too, experience the brokenness and alienation that is rooted in our failure to recognize one another’s full humanity. Racism still lives like an unseen spiritual force—in the atmosphere and in our psyches—impacting our thoughts, assumptions, and behaviors, the quality of our relationships, the policies and practices of our institutions, and our culture’s sense of what is right, what is true, what is beautiful, and who belongs. In ways both explicit and implicit, we communicate to one another whether we really ‘belong’ in our communities, institutions, and public spaces.
            “What the young people, families, and clergy in Ferguson are fighting for is ‘Belonging,’” Rev. Michael-Ray goes on. “Hands up!” he then cries. And the small crowd of witnesses around him respond, “We ALL belong!”
Through days and nights of protests, people have repeated Michael Brown’s final reported gestures and words: “Hands up! Don’t shoot!” At this press conference, we transform that desperate shout into a mighty affirmation of our common humanity.
            “I hear the news of Michael Brown’s death, and my heart breaks,” I say when it’s my turn. “But I want my heart to break openWhen our hearts break open, our actions become more compassionate, more just, more humble, more inclusive, and more powerful. As a white woman, when I respond from a broken-open heart, from an open mind and active hands and feet, it means I am accountable to those most harmed by the ongoing systems of oppression in this country. It means I will step out of my comfort zone to name how the presence of racism and white supremacy cuts off my full humanity too. It means not just to stand in solidarity, but to act in solidarity to take down the systems of oppression that benefit white-skinned people like me and disadvantage peoples of color.
            “White supremacy,” I go on—and friends, I step out of my comfort zone to use that phrase. “White supremacy is the false construction that one group of people is ‘better’ than another based on the color of our skin, based on the idea of ‘race,’ which both faith and science tell us is merely a social construct. How many races are there?”
“ONE race!” the witnesses shout. “The HUMAN race!”
“And we all belong!” we chorus.
 
The Unity in Unitarian
In the old days, the concept of “unity” in Unitarian referred to our ancestors’ sense that there was just one God, rather than a Trinity. One unifying source and spirit infusing everyone and everything—this heretical thought set our ancestors apart from their own religious ancestors.
            Ours is still an evolving faith—always has been, always will be. We honor the wisdom and meaning we make of our own experiences in the language of our times. In the 21st century, the “unity” in Unitarian calls us to undo the deadly divisions caused by systemic racism and white supremacy, along with all other forms of oppression.
Come, join the beloved and courageous conversations that will show us the way. For today our unity surely means “we ALL belong.”
With great love and anticipation,
Rev. Nancy

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